Riverview History Photos

Welcome to our Riverview History photo gallery. Scroll through for a brief history of our neighbourhood, and click on the images to view them at full size. Many of these images have been retouched, so underneath each photo is a link to the original image plus additional information. We’ll continue to update this page as we acquire more photos.

If you have a piece of Riverview history that you think belongs here, contact us. We’d love to include contributions from the community.

You can contact us at bugle@riverviewcc.ca with any submissions, comments, or questions.

River Park Amusements

From 1890 to 1942, River Park operated south of Clare Ave and stretched along the river on both sides of Osborne. Its amusement park, campground, zoo, and racetrack would host as many as 10,000 visitors a day.

Throughout the years, the River Park midway included tons of attractions such as a merry go round, a Ferris wheel, boat swings, a mini steam engine, the ocean wave, Dodgem’ Speedster bumper cars, the Crazy House, a roller coaster, a roller rink, a soda pop stand, and the superintendent’s house (which is still standing today.)

If you’re interested in learning more about the park, you can read a great article about it from Coaster Enthusiasts of Canada HERE.

miniature train

Covered, open passenger cars behind a miniature locomotive. The superintendent’s house can be seen behind them. It is the last surviving structure from the park, still serving as a house on Clare Avenue.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library 

river park

Crowds at River Park. There are several simple structures with awnings and a tent, as well as the “Carousselle.” 
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

River Park parking lot

Over 100 delegates of the 1938 Canadian Mennonite Brethren Conference. A sign reading “River Park” is visible in the background as is a parking lot, and a building with a sign reading “Tarantella.”‘
ID number: CA CMBS NP017-01-22
Mennonite Archival Information Database (MAID)

River Park Zoo

The River Park zoo was open from 1902 to 1927, with free admission to see its large collection of North American animals. It was said to be the first zoo of its kind in western Canada. It featured three buffalo, seven elk, a pair of white-tailed deer, three moose, a caribou, 30 timberwolves (including coyotes), two rocky mountain goats, two brown bears, two black bears, two red foxes, two silver foxes, two lynx, two porcupines, two badgers, a horned owl, a golden eagle, grouse, too many tame rabbits to count, over a hundred pigeons, four raccoons, a collection of wild geese, prairie chickens, a rare squirrel from Iowa, and many, many more.
bears in bear pit

Two American black bears in one of two bear pits at River Park. One is lying down, the other is begging for candy. Mailed as a postcard in 1911.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

Buffalo at River Park

The buffalo had three runs, 200 by 300 feet. They would occupy one while grass grew in the others. They had trees for shade in the summer, and a shed for shelter in the winter.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

elk and zoo keeper

River Park’s zookeeper, Nikulás Ottenson, poses with one of the park’s tame elk. 
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

river park buffalo

Buffalo in its corral at River Park.
Date: before 1912
Image courtesy of Peel’s Prairie Provinces, a digital initiative of the University of Alberta Libraries.
Attribution – Non-Commercial – Creative Commons

moose and calf at river park

A moose cow and calf, and a deer, likely in River Park in the wintertime.
Taken before 1910
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

Pontoon Bridge

River Park had two pontoon bridges. One was a toll bridge near the current Elm Park Bridge that would allow patrons to pass from River Park over to Elm Park. Next to it were the Winnipeg Ski Club building and the old ski jump.

Before St. Vital Bridge was built in 1965, a second pontoon bridge sat at its location and let River Park visitors cross over to Elm Park. Next to that pontoon bridge were the canoe club and dock, and the boathouse where they offered canoe and rowboat rentals.

The Elm Park sign is visible on the opposite side of the river in many of these photos.
pontoon bridge

People cross the pontoon bridge into Elm Park. A sign on the bridge reads, “Admission 5¢ Each.” Other sign reads, “Dancing [illegible] Orchestra.” A man stands ready to accept admission payment. A boat has just passed under the bridge.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

pontoon bridge
pontoon bridge

Boat pulled up along the bank near pontoon bridge.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

pontoon bridge and ferry

A section of the Elm Park Pontoon Bridge has been moved for a Winnipeg Navigation Company steamboat, the Alberta, to pass through. This riverboat carried passengers along the Red River between Norwood and Riverside Park (now part of the U of M’s Fort Garry Campus). Elm Park is on the far bank.
Winnipeg Public Library

pontoon bridge

Elm Park on the far bank. Two canoes sit along the nearest bank.
Date: between 1890 and 1912
Winnipeg Public Library

 

pontoon bridge

Boathouse next to pontoon bridge.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

pontoon bridge

In the foreground a lady & gentleman paddle their own canoe, the man sitting on the rail is W. Harold Brown, formerly Manager of the Douglas, Lowry & Ramsey Electric Railways. He is at present on a visit to his old home in Douglas.
Date: ca. 1914
Image courtesy of Peel’s Prairie Provinces, a digital initiative of the University of Alberta Libraries.
Attribution – Non-Commercial – Creative Commons

pontoon bridge

River Park in the distance on the left and Elm Park on the right.
Date Range: Between 1890 and 1909
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

pontoon bridge from Elm Park

Looking through Elm Park at a pontoon bridge connecting to River Park.
Date Range: Between 1890 and 1907
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

pontoon bridge

Elm Park on the far bank.  Two men stand on what appears to be a small docking area under the middle of the bridge.
Between 1890 and 1912.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

Winters in Riverpark

Riverview’s River Park kept the fun going throughout the winter. Snowshoeing, dog sledding, toboggan slides, a ski jump, and skating on the river drew in crowds during the cold season.

Two toboggan slides faced each other on the river bank between the Elm Park Bridge and Osborne street. They sat on the same side of the river, and people would rent sleds and ride from one to the other. The tobogganers pavilion building sat close by.

This ski jump, built in 1922, was used by The Winnipeg Ski Club and the Puffin Ski Club. Skiers would have made average jumps of about 15 meters. It would have been somewhere between where the BDI bridge and the St. Vital bridge sit today.

Dog sled River Park 1923

Dog sled in River Park in 1923.
Public domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

ski jumper

One skier has just left the take-off table and is airborne; other skiers wait at the bottom. The photograph is taken from the top of the ramp.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

toboggan slide

Tobogganing and skating on river. 
Date Mailed: 1925
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

Dog sled River Park 1923

Dog sled in River Park in 1923.
Public Domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

toboggan slide

Men, women, and children ride a toboggan. 
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

toboggan slide

Date Mailed: 1923
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

women snowshoeing River Park 1923

Group of women snowshoeing in River Park in 1923.
Public domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

toboggan slide

A double toboggan slide.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

ski jump

The ski jump on the bank of the Red River in River Park.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

toboggan slide

A double toboggan slide in River Park. 
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

Edison Hall

Edison hall opened in 1890 and was one of the park’s first buildings. It got its name from being home to the first phonograph officially show in the city, which park-goers would listen to with ear-phones. The hall would have also hosted concerts, plays, picnics, and dances. Streetcars from the Park Line passed in front of the hall.

The Park Line

The development of Riverview started with the Park Line. Albert Austin wanted to create Winnipeg’s first electric streetcars, but the city was too scared of the new technology to let him build within the city. So, in 1890, Austin purchased the land to create River Park.

At that time Riverview was a mostly undeveloped area outside city limits. Austin created River Park as a destination for his new streetcars and ran them between the park and the city down Osborne St (Formerly Pembina St).

Edison Hall

Looking over street railroad tracks at part of River Park with Edison Hall on the left. A streetcar at right is labelled “Park Line. 124.”
Date Mailed: 1907
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

Edison Hall

Buildings in the park. Telephone and power lines. A streetcar in the distance.
Date Mailed: 1906
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

street car park line

Street Car #88. Upper front sign reads “Park Line.” Trolley in rear, also designated “Park Line,” is #112. 
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

park line

The motorman and conductor pose by streetcar #390 in Winnipeg.
Image courtesy of Peel’s Prairie Provinces, a digital initiative of the University of Alberta Libraries.
Attribution – Non-Commercial – Creative Commons

street car park line

Street Car #92. Upper front sign reads “Park Line.” Trolley in rear, also designated “Park Line,” is #112. 
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

park line

The motorman and conductor pose by streetcar #500 in Winnipeg.
Image courtesy of Peel’s Prairie Provinces, a digital initiative of the University of Alberta Libraries.
Attribution – Non-Commercial – Creative Commons

Brandon Avenue Floatplane Base

James A. Richardson purchased the land to create Riverview’s Brandon Avenue Floatplane Base in 1927, a year after founding Western Canada Airways Limited. Within a few years, the airline was the second largest in the British empire. 

The base sat where the Redboine Boat Club and Churchill High School now sit. At its peak, it employed more than 30 engineers and mechanics focused on the maintenance and repair of bush planes. The Royal Canadian Air Force shared the base until 1931, and it was sold in the late 1960s.

Allan Peden wrote in a letter for Altitude magazine about his experience living on Arnold Avenue across from the base:
“I lived on Arnold Avenue during the 1940s just a few hundred yards from the Brandon Avenue float base. And when CF-ARM made a low pass over Fort Rouge — and it usually did prior to setting down on the Red River — I would run, hell bent for leather across the field in front of our house to the edge of the river to witness this beautiful aircraft touch down, ever so gracefully on the water. It was a sight I’ll never forget.” 

plane on river

A Cessna Crane owned by Konrad (Konnie) Johannesson. 
“Johannesson Flying Service” is written across the side. In this photo, taken in roughly 1946, a Norseman and what is likely a DH Dragonfly sit along the shore.
From: Brian Johannesson
Rare Aviation Photos

CF-DTL, Noorduyn Norseman IV

An old Noorduyn Norseman IV, likely 1946-1948. Bill Peden sits in the boat by the motor and Allan Peden in the water holding the boat.
CF-DIC is in the background. This Cessna Crane (T50) on floats was owned by G.H.Goodshall Equipment Ltd.
Flickr

de Havilland DH-83C Fox Moth CF-BNO

David Purvis on a pontoon of the De Havilland DH-83C Fox Moth CF-BNO, likely in the mid-1940s.
Flickr

Cockpit of CF-ARM Junkers JU52_1

Allan Peden sitting at the controls of CF-ARM Junkers JU52/1, likely 1947-1948.
“One day CF-ARM was left open and my chum and I took the opportunity to slip in and take each other’s picture sitting in the cockpit,” Allan wrote in a letter for Altitude magazine.
Flickr

de Havilland DH-83C Fox Moth CF-BNO

Allan and Bill Peden looking into the passenger compartment from the pontoon of this De Havilland DH-83C Fox Moth CF-BNO.
Flickr

CF-ARM Junkers JU52_1

Allan Peden on the wing of a CF-ARM Junkers JU-52/1 (CF-ARM), likely in 1941-42.
Flickr

River Park

When it was first built, Riverview wasn’t yet a part of Winnipeg, so River Park was an escape into nature for city dwellers. It even had a campground.

river park wooded path

A path along the edge of River Park. There appears to be a man on a bicycle near the bend in the path.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

lovers lane river park

Lovers lane at River Park from the 1903 book Illustrated Souvenir of Winnipeg.
Date: 1903 or before
Illustrated Souvenir of Winnipeg

river park forest

Forest at River Park from the 1903 book Illustrated Souvenir of Winnipeg.
Date: 1903 or before
Illustrated Souvenir of Winnipeg

poplar grove at river park

Poplar Grove at River Park from the 1903 book Illustrated Souvenir of Winnipeg.
Date: 1903 or before
Illustrated Souvenir of Winnipeg

Riverview Community Centre

The community centre started with an ice rink, field, and a railway boxcar where you could change into your skates. In 1948 the boxcar was replaced with a new yellow stucco building. Read more about the early days of the club from Wayne Stewart’s ‘Riverview Community Club Memories’ HERE.

Fisher Park

(Formerly Pembina Park)

Community Centre 1948

Exterior of the Riverview Community Centre from approximately 1948.
City of Winnipeg Archives

Community Centre 1948 2

Exterior of the Riverview Community Centre from approximately 1948.
City of Winnipeg Archives

Pembina Park Fisher Park 1938

People gathered near a flower garden at Pembina Park (now known as Fisher Park) in 1938.
Public Domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

Hospitals

In 1911, the King Edward Memorial Hospital opened, followed by the King George Isolation Hospital three years later, then the Princess Elizabeth Hospital in 1950.
 
Together, the three hospitals formed the Winnipeg Municipal Hospital. At the time, the King George Isolation Hospital and the King Edward Memorial Hospital were considered the most advanced hospitals in the world to provide care for patients with communicable diseases. They were built to fight diseases such as typhoid fever, diphtheria, smallpox and tuberculosis, and later in the 1950s, they were essential in the city’s response to the polio epidemic. The hospitals were home to many confined to iron lungs, and many polio patients of that epidemic still live at the Riverview Health Centre today. As communicable diseases became less of a threat, the Princess Elizabeth Hospital was opened and became the first long-term care facility in Canada.
King Edward Memorial Hospital and King George Isolation Hospital

King George and King Edward Hospitals
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

King George Isolation Hospital

King George Hospital
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library
Original image

King Edward Memorial Hospital

King Edward Hospital
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

hospital opening royalty

The Duke of Connaught (wearing top hat) officially opens the King Edward Hospital. Princess Patricia is seen holding a parasol on the left. Several people gather near the hospital doors for the event.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library
Original image

1950s Flood

Oakwood ave flood 1950

People boating down Oakwood Avenue.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

roof trapped under elm park bridge during flood

The roof of a building trapped under the Elm Park Bridge.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

hospitals 1950s flood

The Municipal Hospitals on Morley Ave.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

municipal hospitals flooded

Looking down a residential street toward the King George Hospital.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library 

osborne subway flood 1950s

The underpass on Osborne Street looking south.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

crane at elm park bridge during 1950s flood

Construction equipment and lumber at the Elm Park Bridge during the flood.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

Municipal hospitals floodes

The Municipal Hospitals on Morley Ave.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

Riverview School flood 1950

École Riverview School
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

elm park bridge 1950s flood

Wood and debris washed onto the Elm Park Bridge.
Public domain
Winnipeg Public Library

North from Arnold and Hay 1950s flood

North from Arnold and Hay, with the Manitoba Legislature in the distance.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

bdi bridge 1950s flood

Elm Park Bridge
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

from roof of pelisier 1950s flood

Lyndale Drive, captured from a rooftop near Mulvey Ave.
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

morley ave 1950s flood

Morley Avenue
Any reproductions must credit the Harold K. White Studio.
City of Winnipeg Archives

Aerials and Maps

1895 winnipeg riverview map half built
1895 winnipeg riverview map index

Waghorn’s Guide map and street index. A small promotional pamphlet published by J.R. Waghorn in 1895. The pamphlet contains a street map of Winnipeg, a street index, and advertisements for various Winnipeg businesses including the Clarendon Hotel, the Redwood Brewery, and the Massey-Harris Company. Railway lines are in black and electric street railway lines are in red.
Public domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

Transportation Map of Greater Winnipeg Showing Street Car Trolley Bus and Bus Lines 1941

Transportation Map of Greater Winnipeg Showing Street Car, Trolley Bus and Bus Lines (1941). Winnipeg Electric Company.
Flickr

illustrated map 1935 cover
illustrated map 1935

A 1935 promotional map created by the Publicity Bureau of Winnipeg and Manitoba titled “For Your Guidance While in Winnipeg”. Map was originally folded as a pamphlet, the front page of which features a graphic of two people driving down Highway 14 (now Highway 75) to Winnipeg. The map is not scale and features cartoon depictions of tourist destinations and landmarks around Winnipeg and St. Boniface. The maps shows major streets, railroads, and street railway lines. The map side was originally framed and cut to fit. At a result a small part of the front page is cut off, including a stamp reading “St. Raphael’s Ukrainian Immigrants’ Welfare Association of Can[ada]”.
Public domain
City of Winnipeg Achives

aerial riverview 1940s

Aerial view of Riverview, St. Vital, and Wildwood. [194-]Public domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

riverview aerial 1945

CNR Yards 1945
Public domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

riverview aerial 1945

CNR Yards 1945
Public domain
City of Winnipeg Archives

Winnipeg Provincial Electoral Divisions 1870
Plan of River Lots in the Parishes of St John St James and St Boniface 1874

Plan of River Lots in the Parishes of St John, St. James and St Boniface. Sinclair, Duncan and George McPhillips. Ottawa: Dominion Lands Branch, 1874. 
Flickr

river lots 1875

Plan of river lots in the parishes of St. Norbert and St. Vital, Province of Manitoba.
Creator: George McPhillips
George McPhillips. Maps, plans, and charts. Library and Archives Canada, e011205909 
Flickr

Plan Showing Winnipeg Electric Railway Tracks and Localities where Water Pipes have been Damaged by Electrolysis 1910